DES: A population health tragedy

The Boston Symposium

Symposium in Boston
Symposium at Mount Holyoke

Boston University
Wednesday, March 1 5:30 – 7 pm
CAS B12 (725 Commonwealth Ave.)

Kari Christiansen
NIH National Cancer Institute DES Follow-up Study Steering Committee
The history of DES, DES Action USA

Linda Titus, Sci, D.
Associate Director of the Hood Center for Children and Families
Recent and ongoing research on DES, 3rd generation, what we might expect in the future

David J. Fine
Attorney, of Council, Rubin Hays, PC
DES Changing the law, how the law applies in reproductive health issues

Suzanne Robotti
DES daughter, Executive Director DES Action, USA, founder MedShadow Foundation
It’s not just DES
The Flyer

 

The Mount Holyoke Symposium

Mt. Holyoke College
Thursday, March 2 5:30 – 7pm
Cleveland Building, room L2

Kari Christianson
NIH National Cancer Institute DES Follow-up Study Steering Committee
The history of DES, DES Action USA

Julie Palmer. Sc.D
Associate Director, Slone Epidemiology Center; Professor of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Principal Investigator (PI) at Boston University.
Current research in DES and the 3rd generation

Karen Calechman
Mount Holyoke College grad, DES daughter
A personal view

Marlene Gerber-Fried
Co-Chair Five Colleges Reproductive Health, Rights and Justice Program, Professor of Philosophy, Faculty Director of Civil Liberties and Public Policy, Hampshire College
Reproductive health rights challenges, it’s not just DES

Elizabeth Myers
Director of Special Collections at Smith College
DES Action Archives at the Sophia Smith Archival Library

Suzanne Robotti
DES daughter, Executive Director DES Action, USA, founder MedShadow Foundation

The Flyer

The Mt Holyoke College symposium will be videotaped and available on the DES Action website in about a month.

Both the symposiums are open to the public and free, so please come and bring your daughter, mother, son and spouse.


About DES


Diethylstilbestrol (DES) was the first synthetic estrogen to be created. Never patented, it was cheap and easy to produce, so DES was made by hundreds of drug companies in the U.S. and around the world. DES was prescribed to millions of pregnant women in the mistaken belief that it could prevent miscarriage. It did not work but instead, DES harmed the mothers, the children born of those pregnancies and possibly the grandchildren and beyond.


Read more about DES


Read This

In The DES Archives: Learning from a Public Health Tragedy, Su Robotti explains to the Our Bodies Ourselves audience about the significance of the donation of the DES Action archives to Smith College and about the related symposium at Mount Holyoke College.



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